Rag & Bone Lays Off Retail, Corporate Workers

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Rag & Bone is yet another company that’s making permanent changes due to the economic fallout caused by the coronavirus.

The brand has permanently laid off at least 70 employees, WWD has learned, a mix of retail and corporate workers, and furloughed the rest of its staff for the time being. The layoffs affect operations in the U.S., where it has 30 stores, including several outlet locations.

A company representative confirmed there were layoffs without specifying how many people were affected, but said there was a reduction in employees across the whole of corporate and retail.

“A comprehensive assessment of all areas within the business was made to maintain the critical needs of the organization,” the company said in a statement.

Those who lost their jobs with Rag & Bone permanently were given severance and assistance with health-care benefits. According to

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Some Ohioans are rebelling against coronavirus health orders from Gov. DeWine

COLUMBUS, Ohio — In House chambers in Columbus, at a drag strip near Cincinnati and in a Dollar General store in Ashland, Ohioans are defying the governor and health director’s admonitions to protect themselves and others from the coronavirus.

West of Cambridge along U.S. 40, Vicki Brearley has kept her National Road Diner open — attracting visitors from all over Ohio — despite multiple visits from the county sheriff’s and health departments.

“I believe it’s my constitutional right to open my business now,” she says, even though Gov. Mike DeWine and Health Director Dr. Amy Acton declared that dine-in restaurants can’t reopen until May 21.

In Orrville, in northeastern Ohio’s Wayne County, the “Playground Patriots” gathered at a local park last weekend and allowed their children to use the playground equipment closed to prevent spreading the virus. Organizers distributed a flier via Facebook saying, “We are done giving up freedoms,

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More AL Businesses To Reopen As Ivey Amends Safer-At-Home Order

MONTGOMERY, AL — Restaurants, barber shops and more small businesses will be allowed to reopen in Alabama on Monday as Gov. Kay Ivey amended the “stay-at-home” order while also extending it until May 22. Although cases of COVID-19 continue to spread, Ivey said at a Friday news conference she believes opening this phase of local businesses can help the economy recover and — with social distancing — can prevent another outbreak.

“I want to thank every Alabamian for doing their part to help us combat this awful virus,” Ivey said. “I know it has been tough on y’all, but it ain’t been a picnic for me either.”

The new order goes into effect May 11:

Under the amended order:

  • Churches may reopen and hold services but with social distancing guidelines

  • Restaurants can open at 50 percent occupancy rate.

  • Barber shops and salons, will be able to open with

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Basking Ridge Hero Is Keeping Her Group Home Residents Safe

BASKING RIDGE, NJ — When times are tough, heroes emerge. We all know someone who’s making a difference right now as we live through unprecedented times. Here at Patch, we’ve launched an initiative to help recognize these everyday heroes.

This submission comes from Mike Rubinfeld of Basking Ridge, who nominated his wife Linda Beldring Rubinfeld of Basking Ridge:

Is the nominee considered an “essential worker”?:
Yes

What does the nominee do for work?:
Co-Manager of Bethel Ridge group home

Why do you believe the nominee should be recognized or honored?
She has continuously provided excellent supervision/service to disabled residents of the group home, encouraging them to be their best and as independent as possible. She has put in extra shifts, including overnights when short-staffed, and is loved by each of the six residents. All this despite the fear of COVID-19; thankfully she tested negative about a week ago. And most

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Supreme Court declines to lift Pennsylvania’s stay-at-home order

Washington — The Supreme Court on Wednesday declined to lift an executive order from Pennsylvania Governor Tom Wolf that mandated the closure of all businesses in the state deemed nonessential as part of efforts to curb the spread of the coronavirus.

A group of businesses and other entities in the state asked the high court last week to block enforcement of Wolf’s executive order, which was issued March 19 in response to the coronavirus. There were no noted dissents. 

The Pennsylvania businesses argued Wolf’s lockdown order was unconstitutional and filed an emergency request with the Pennsylvania Supreme Court arguing it went beyond Wolf’s authority. The state court, however, sided with Wolf and rejected the challenge. The businesses then asked the U.S. Supreme Court to review the lower court’s decision.

“The executive order and similar orders by governors across the country is doing substantial, unprecedented damage to the economy,” the

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