Ulrich Grimm, Global Head of Non-apparel Design, to Depart Calvin Klein After 22 Years

Ulrich Grimm, global head of non-apparel design at Calvin Klein Inc., is leaving the company, effective Aug. 2.

Grimm has been with Calvin Klein for almost 22 years and previously served as executive vice president, design, shoes and accessories.

During his time at the brand, the highly regarded Grimm built a strong global alignment across its accessories, including some of the licensed categories such as eyewear and watches and jewelry. He oversaw design for accessories, footwear and home.

Reached for comment, Grimm told WWD that following the pandemic, several CKI divisions were restructured, and his position was eliminated. He said he’s planning to enjoy the rest of the summer at the beach and then explore opportunities either in New York or potentially return to Europe for the right opportunity.

“I will always be honored to say that Mr. Klein hired me directly 23 years ago to be responsible for

Read More

An Incoming Harvard MBA Candidate Describes How To Design A Winning Application

Looking for advice on drafting a winning application to Harvard or another elite school? Look no further. hbs.edu

May 30th, 2018 was Decision Day — the day when I would know my fate.

Two weeks earlier, I had interviewed for Harvard Business School via its 2+2 deferred admissions program. Now, as a friend and I boarded a flight from Paris to London, I checked my phone for news of a decision.

It was 5:40 p.m. local time. Decisions were scheduled to be released at noon in Boston, which meant 6 p.m. where I was located. With no news as I boarded the plane, and with no Wi-Fi on the aircraft, I had to wait until I landed to either celebrate or be met with disappointment.

No matter the outcome, I knew that I would eventually end up at Harvard Business School. If I got the unfortunate news

Read More

L.A. mayor calls on artists to design and spread the message: Wear a mask

A free, downloadable poster, designed by Shepard Fairey's Studio Number One and Camilla Lonis, is part of the city's new L.A. Mask Print Project. <span class="copyright">(Studio Number One)</span>
A free, downloadable poster, designed by Shepard Fairey’s Studio Number One and Camilla Lonis, is part of the city’s new L.A. Mask Print Project. (Studio Number One)

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti’s latest weapon against COVID-19? Art.

On Wednesday, Garcetti announced a new initiative called the L.A. Mask Print Project, in which L.A. County artists can submit designs for posters bearing the public health message of the moment: Wear a mask. Posters chosen for the city’s coronavirus website can be downloaded for free, and Garcetti is encouraging local businesses and residents to display them.

“Wearing a mask is critical to helping us stop the spread of this virus, safely reopen our city and save lives,” Garcetti said in an email to The Times. “And we need to use every tool at our disposal to deliver this message across Los Angeles, throughout our country and around the world.”

Shepard Fairey’s Studio

Read More

A Chinese Carmaker Has Already Ripped Off The Ford Bronco’s Design

Well, that looks suspiciously similar.

Chinese automakers are infamous for cribbing the designs of other makes and models. Even as the Chinese auto industry matures, there are still new models coming out that look awfully similar to those of other automakers. The latest comes from Wey, a brand established by Great Wall Motors in 2017, and it seems like it used the new Ford Bronco as the starting and finishing points.  

Codenamed the Wey P01, the rugged-looking SUV only has a handful of teasers available for us to look at, though they do show off quite a bit. Both the Bronco and P01 feature upright front ends with Wey going as far as to flip the Bronco’s headlight design treatment as if no one would notice. They even wrap around it the front to the front fender to give it a bit of personality. However, it does feature a

Read More

This Underground Bunker Design Aims to Simulate Real-Life With Artificial Sunlight, Bike Paths, and Dog Walking Areas

Photo credit: Instagram / Sergey Makhno Architects
Photo credit: Instagram / Sergey Makhno Architects

From House Beautiful

Back in March, we brought you news that, as the coronavirus spread across the globe, the luxury bunker company Survival Condos—which creates survival condos out of former World War II bunkers—had seen a sudden a spike in interest. What caused this? In short, fear. Folks were looking to quarantine and these former WWII bunkers seemed like a safe spot.

As far as COVID-19 goes, hunkering down in a doomsday bunker isn’t any safer than just quarantining in your own home. However, the idea of luxury bunkers built to last through everything — including an apocalypse— is still going strong. Sergey Makhno Architects, located in Ukraine, recently drew up a design plan for its own modern-day doomsday shelter. Unlike Survival Condos, these bunkers would be located completely underground, but still manage to offer the comforts and security of

Read More