Oregon’s racist past fuels ongoing protests against injustice in Portland

A predominantly white city tucked away in the northwest corner of the U.S. hardly seems the logical spot to emerge as the new flash point of the protests against racism and police brutality that have raged across the country for nearly two months.

Then again, both Portland and its home state of Oregon have a troubled past that animates the ongoing demonstrations, now in their eighth week.

Add to that a president sinking in the polls and eager to rally his base behind a vow to “dominate the streets’’ in an election year, and suddenly Portland has been thrust into the national spotlight for something other than quirkiness.

Experts say the unrequested and unwelcome arrival of federal law enforcement agents in recent weeks and their violent recent confrontations with protesters in the city’s downtown have rekindled a movement that had been simmering down.

The Oregonian/OregonLive reported more than 2,000 people,

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This Portland Home Was Designed to Feel Like a Parisian Apartment

Photo credit: Haris Kenjar
Photo credit: Haris Kenjar

From House Beautiful

Tudor-style bungalow homes from the 1940s with small kitchens and disjointed flows are fairly common in northeast Portland, and the one that JHL Design was hired to renovate for a family of three was no different. But rather than seeing problems, the Portland-based interior design firm saw possibilities: original mahogany woodwork, original hardwood doors, and small details like intact picture rails in the formal living spaces. So, together with Thesis Studio Architecture, the team worked out a plan that added only 150 square feet to the footprint—but through what JHL Design principal Holly Freres calls “a rearrangement of space” made the home feel significantly larger.

Photo credit: Haris Kenjar
Photo credit: Haris Kenjar

The first step was to reconfigure the entire main floor, which contained a narrow kitchen and two bedrooms at the back of the house. The bedrooms, Freres explains, “monopolized access to the private,

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